Serves 6

Notes

You can get grapes -year–round, but, as you know by now, I love cooking in season, so for this recipe I would change the fruit with the season. Peaches would be great in early summer, as would fresh figs in late summer. Apples and pears would be de-lightful in the winter. The one thing you need to calibrate is the time it takes for the fruits to cook. So add the fruit earlier if you’re using apples or pears, or later if peaches or figs.

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for the pot
  • 12 cipolline onions (about 12 ounces), peeled
  • 2 pork tenderloins, about 2 pounds total
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons -extra--virgin olive oil
  • -All--purpose flour, for dredging
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 6 fresh sage leaves
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 8 ounces seedless green grapes, removed from stems (about 2 cups)
Lidia’s Commonsense Italian Cooking

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Lidia’s Commonsense Italian Cooking

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Directions

Bring a medium pot of salted water to boil, add the onions, and cook until almost tender but not falling apart, about 8 to 10 minutes. Drain and set aside, reserving 1 cup of the onion–cooking water.

Cut each pork tenderloin into six chunks. With a meat mallet, pound each to a thickness of about ½ inch.

In a large skillet, over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in the olive oil. Spread flour on a plate for dredging. Season the pork with ½ teaspoon of salt, and lightly dredge it in the flour. Brown the pork on both sides, about 2 minutes per side, and remove to a plate.

Add the onions to the skillet, and let them cook a few minutes, until lightly caramelized. Add the white wine, and bring to a boil. Once the wine is almost reduced, add the sage, the reserved -onion–cooking water, and the remaining ½ teaspoon of salt. Let the sauce simmer for a few minutes, until it is reduced by almost half. Whisk in the vinegar and the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter. Add the pork back to the skillet with the grapes, and simmer until sauce is thickened and grapes just begin to soften, about 3 to 4 minutes

Lidia’s Commonsense Italian Cooking

Cookbook

Lidia’s Commonsense Italian Cooking

buy now